ARCHIVES UNIVESTITAIRES .. AFRICA .. NIGERIA

Item: Institute of African Studies: Research Review Vol. 05 No. 2 1968: 33-60
Title: NIGERIA: BACKGROUND TO THE CRISIS
 
Item: Institute of African Studies: Research Review Vol. 08 Nos. 1&2 1992: 76-89
Title: ORAL TRADITION AND ETHNICITY IN THE CREATION OF NEW STATES SN NIGERIA: THE CASE OF AKWA IBOH
 
Item: Glendora Review: African Quarterly on the Arts Vol. 01 No. 3 1996: 39-41
Title: Flogging a Dead Horse? The State of Tertiary Book Publishing in Nigeria
 
Item: Glendora Review: African Quarterly on the Arts Vol. 01 No. 4 1996: 89-101
Title: Contemporary English Language Theatre in Nigeria: From the Page to the Stage.
 
Item: Glendora Review: African Quarterly on the Arts Vol. 03 No. 1 2000: 24-26
Title: Nigeria‘s New Soho
 
Item: Glendora Review: African Quarterly on the Arts Vol. 02 No. 2 1997: 92-104
Title: The traditions of CARTOONING in Nigeria
 
Item: Glendora Review: African Quarterly on the Arts Vol. 03 No. 2 2001:
Title: Art Expo Nigeria 2002
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 10 No. 2, 1995: 61-80
Title: Regional Inequalities in the Process of Nigeria‘s Development: Socio-Political and Administrative Perspective
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 10 No. 1, 1995: 37-52
Title: Continuing Education Programmes for Socioeconomic Development in Nigeria: An Antidote for Mass Student Failure in COSC in Lesotho
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 10 No. 1, 1995: 25-36
Title: Environmental Hazards and the Health Status of Women and Children in a Riverine Community in Nigeria: Nikrowa in Edo State
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 6 No. 2, 1991: 33-52
Title: Achieving Self-reliance in Food Production in Nigeria: Maximising the Contribution of Rural Women
 
Item: African Journal of Political Economy Vol. 02 No. 4 1989: 34-49
Title: The Poor and Politics in Nigeria: An Exploratory Note
 
Item: African Journal of Political Economy Vol. 01 No. 2 1987: 119-123
Title: Book Review: Food and Politics in Nigeria
 
Item: UTAFITI: Journal of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences University of dar es salaam Vol. 07 No. 2 1985: 1-10
Title: Primary Education in Nigeria: What is it all about?
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 14 No. 2, 1999: 71-86
Title: Social Costs of Poverty: The Case of Crime in Nigeria
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 15 No. 1, 2000: 15-26
Title: Overcoming Destitution through Literacy: A Case of the Disabled Persons’ Literacy Programme in Kano State, Nigeria
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 15 No. 1, 2000: 61-78
Title: Ethnic Conflict and Democracy in Nigeria: The Marginalisation Question
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 15 No. 2, 2000: 5-32
Title: Poverty alleviation with economic growth strategy: prospects and challenges in contemporary Nigeria
 
Item: African Journal of Political Economy Vol. 02 No. 1 1988: 132-147
Title: The Abuja Statement
Creator: Federal Republic of Nigeria
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol. 1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 2-3
Title: Literature and the City
Subject and Keywords: Cities and towns — Nigeria
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 8-13
Title: Jazz Music Influences on the Work of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti
Subject and Keywords: Jazz musicians — Nigeria
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 8-13
Title: Jazz Music Influences on the Work of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti
Subject and Keywords: Musicians — Nigeria
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 14-23
Title: I Am Still Trying to Hold on to What Moves People about Music
Subject and Keywords: Popular music — Nigeria
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 14-23
Title: I Am Still Trying to Hold on to What Moves People about Music
Subject and Keywords: Musicians — Nigeria — Lagos — Interviews.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 23
Title: MUSON Celebrates in Lagos
Subject and Keywords: Music — Societies, etc. — Nigeria
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 23
Title: MUSON Celebrates in Lagos
Subject and Keywords: Musical Society Of Nigeria
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 24-25
Title: Of Strings and Rattling Gongs: The Story of MUSON
Subject and Keywords: Music — Societies, etc. — Nigeria — History
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 24-25
Title: Of Strings and Rattling Gongs: The Story of MUSON
Subject and Keywords: Musical Society Of Nigeria — History
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 41
Title: Ibadan: A Story of the ’60s
Subject and Keywords: Ibadan (Nigeria) — Intellectual life.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 42-44
Title: Ibadan: A review
Subject and Keywords: Ibadan (Nigeria) — Intellectual life.
Item: Glendora Review Vol. 1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 45-46
Title: A Betrayal of the Credo Group
Subject and Keywords: Ibadan (Nigeria) — Intellectual life.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol. 1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 47-50
Title: How I Broke into the NBC Studios
Subject and Keywords: Ibadan (Nigeria) — Intellectual life.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 57-59
Title: A dip in the sea
Subject and Keywords: Nigeria — Drama
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 66-67
Title: Outburst Of Fireflies
Subject and Keywords: Nigeria — Poetry
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.6 No. 2, 1991: 33-52
Title: Achieving Self-reliance in Food Production in Nigeria: Maximising the Contribution of Rural Women
Subject and Keywords: Rural women — Nigeria — Social conditions.
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.6 No. 2, 1991: 33-52
Title: Achieving Self-reliance in Food Production in Nigeria: Maximising the Contribution of Rural Women
Subject and Keywords: Women farmers — Nigeria
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.4 No. 1, 1989: 47-59
Title: Patterns of Psychiatric Illness: A Study in Kaduna Psychiatric Facilities
Subject and Keywords: Mental illness — Treatment — Nigeria — Kaduna State.
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.4 No. 1, 1989: 47-59
Title: Patterns of Psychiatric Illness: A Study in Kaduna Psychiatric Facilities
Subject and Keywords: Mentally ill — Care — Nigeria — Kaduna State.
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 6 No. 2, 1991: 33-52
Title: Achieving Self-reliance in Food Production in Nigeria: Maximising the Contribution of Rural Women
Subject and Keywords: Women farmers — Nigeria
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol. 6 No. 2, 1991: 33-52
Title: Achieving Self-reliance in Food Production in Nigeria: Maximising the Contribution of Rural Women
Subject and Keywords:

Item: Glendora Review Vol. 1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 2-3
Title: Literature and the City
Description: Leading Nigerian poet Niyi Osundare writes on the nature of cities in Nigeria, Africa and the world. Cities are supposed to be inspiring — for example, Dublin for James Joyce, Abeokuta, Ibadan and Ishara for Wole Soyinka, and London for Charles Dickens — but they have been dehumanized. In his work Osundare tries to incorporate every part of the world he has visited.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 6-7
Title: An evening with Richard Smith
Description: Richard Smith, African American musician, is interviewed by Tai Ade Fato about his life, music, and his visit to Nigeria.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 8-13
Title: Jazz Music Influences on the Work of Fela Anikulapo-Kuti
Description: « Of all Nigeria‘s popular musicians, bandleader Fela Fela Anikulapo-Kuti is probably the most associated with jazz music. Although his music contains a number of jazz elements, however, Fela does not play ‘jazz’ in the traditional stylistic sense of the term. Nevertheless, there arc reasons why his music is so strongly associated with jazz in Nigeria, and I intend to examine some of those reasons in this essay. The major questions I will address are: One, what are the specific jazz elements in Fela’s Afrobeat? Two, how did these come to exist in his music? Three, to what extent can Afrobeat be called jazzstyle? »–text.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 14-23
Title: I Am Still Trying to Hold on to What Moves People about Music
Description: Interview recorded 24 February 1995 in Lagos, Nigeria between Glendora Review and Nigerian musician Bsade Ologunde, about his life and music, Nigerian jazz, reggae, fuji and other musical style, performance, and other Nigerian musicians such as Fela Kuti.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 23
Title: MUSON Celebrates in Lagos
Description: In 1994 the Musical Society Of Nigeria (MUSON) opened a new center of excellence for classical music in Lagos. This brief note reports on the anniversary.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 24-25
Title: Of Strings and Rattling Gongs: The Story of MUSON
Description: This article briefly outlines the history, site and structure of the Musical Society Of Nigeria‘s (MUSON) center of excellence for classical music in Lagos, Nigeria.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol.1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 42-44
Title: Ibadan: A review
Description: James Gibbs reviews Wole Soyinka’s autobiography, Ibadan : the Penkelemes Years : A Memoir: 1946-1965. « Perhaps because he wants to justify the ‘self-indulgence’ of autobiography, Soyinka has suggested that Ibadan is relevant because in 1993 and 1994 Nigeria relived some of the nightmares of the sixties. Soyinka has sometimes spoken as if drawing this parallel were the main purpose of the book: such a statement should not make us insensitive to the pleasure of taking in the crafting, telling and self-projection that has gone into the writing. Despite immediate reactions to the way it opens in media reviews and the apparently rambling construction, there is, as one would expect from Soyinka the poet, playwright and raconteur, a strong sense of shape: it is not a penkelemes. »–text.
 
Item: Glendora Review Vol. 1 No. 1 June – August, 1995: 69-71
Title: « Biyi Bandele-Thomas: An Undertaker or a dreamer? »
Description: Discusses the films (Even God is Not Wise Enough) and creative writing (Two Horsemen, and The sympathetic undertaker and other dreams; and The man who came in from the back of beyond) of Biyi Bandele-Thomas, a Nigerian resident in Britain. The characters of his plays and novels are given particular attention, as his life in Britain. « Biyi told me much about himself that I see played out in his drama, his novels and in his BBC film. He had grown up in Kafanchan in northern Nigeria …. With the ever-enlarging community of Nigerians in Great Britain and even the transformation of parts of cosmopolitan London to an extension of Nigeria, a writer like Biyi has useful reminders of life at home almost on a daily basis, coupled with the vast library he has managed to keep for himself. He is equally undaunted by the uneasy feeling of producing almost exclusively for a foreign world and culture, seeing that the whole universe itself is merging, metamorphosing into one unitary and homogeneous fold, more anxious than ever to learn about life in lands beyond their immediate surroundings. »–article.
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.6 No. 2, 1991: 33-52
Title: Achieving Self-reliance in Food Production in Nigeria: Maximising the Contribution of Rural Women
Description: « ABSTRACT Development policies in Nigeria have emphasised industrialisation leading to the neglect of agriculture. The oil boom of the 1970s worsened the neglect of the agricultural sector, while the oil glut of the 1980s made it mandatory to revamp the economy. The Structural Adjustment Programme was therefore adopted in 1986, and included a package to revamp the agricultural sector as an integral part of the programme. One of the objectives of the agricultural sector is the achievement of selfreliance in food production to eliminate food imports. The paper argues that if the objective of selfreliance in food production is to be achieved, rural women who produce and process a substantial part of Nigeria’s food crops must become a target group for agricultural policies. They face constraints such as lack of or limited access to education, land, agricultural extension services, agricultural inputs, credit and appropriate technology. Policies b eradicate these constraints should be become an integral part of agricultural development programmes in Nigeria. »–article
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.7 No. 1, 1992: 45-65
Title: Health Services and Military Messianism in Nigeria (1983-1990)
Description: ABSTRACT Since the 1983 military coup in Nigeria health services have been declared a major priority of the military regime. This health priority, along with professed commitments to popular welfare and to the resolution of economic problems, constitutes the declared raison d’etre for intervention. Rather than being a solution, the various reforms which are integral to the overall economic austerity programme have, however, escalated the crisis situation in health care. Aside from the increasing incidence of nutritional disorders directly traceable to the austerity measures, there is more exclusion of the majority from available medical services on the one hand, while privileges such as overseas treatment at public expense continue for top government officials on the other. These obvious contradictions between professed commitment and actual practice are explained against the wider dynamics of economic crisis and attendant adjustments.
Rural women — Nigeria — Social condition
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.7 No. 1, 1992: 67-85
Title: Developmental Implications of Early Mortality Factors in Nigeria
Description: ABSTRACT Past empirical findings about early mortality factors in Nigeria are examined within a proximate determinants framework. This shows that higher parental income and higher density of modem health facilities constitute the combination of factors most likely to bring about sustained reductions in early mortality levels. Evidence relating to various areas of the country do not, on the whole, show up maternal education as the primary early mortality reducing factor that it is acclaimed to be in other developing areas. The need to focus on the fundamental problem of raising general living standards rather than the pursuit of ‘short-cut’ solutions to higher early mortality risks is implied.
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.7 No. 2, 1992: 2J9-52
Title: MEDIA/CULTURAL IMPERIALISM AND NIGERIAN WOMEN: WHOSE CULTURE, WHICH IMPERIALISM?
Description: ABSTRACT Through colonialism and the assimilation of foreign values, people in the excolony are now a cultural hybrid. The local elites who occupy the commanding heights in policy/decision making in Nigeria have been at the forefront of the acceptance and transmission of this new cultural product though various channels, an important part of which is the media. Nigerian women are a growing and active part of this elite structure. One important consequence of the merging of the external component of imperialism which is still being fuelled in the neo-colonial setting by the reality of dependency and economic restructuring and the local component of imperialism, is that it is now difficult to continue to see imperialism strictly as an external imposition.
 
Item: Journal of Social Development in Africa Vol.9 No. 2, 1994: 45-59
Title: Women’s Education and the Use of Bank Credit in Nigeria: Challenges for the Twenty-First Century
Description: ABSTRACT Women constitute a vital resource in developing economies: they account for over half the food produced in these countries; consist of one-fourth of the industrial labour force, additionally fetching most of the household’s water and fuelwood, and are responsible for childcare and household chores. They could even contribute far more to the economy if their opportunities to do that were not so constrained. A particular example of this from Nigeria is that women suffer the disability of nonaccess to bank credit. Yet such credit removes financial constraints and poverty, accelerates the adoption of new technologies and national/personal incomes, apart from raising productivity and employment Unfortunately, in a recent survey by the author (1991), it was found out that the major reasons for the limited use of bank credit by Nigerian women include lack of awareness of the benefits of credit facilities emanating from limited education (as evidenced by low enrolment and literacy levels), few women in business, and dependence on their husbands as breadwinners. The author stresses the point that education, along with income generation capacity, is necessary to enable women to participate equally in the development process. The objectives of this paper can be identified as follows: exposition of the relationship between women’s education and national development; highlighting the state of women’s education in Nigeria and drawing from empirical work the negative effect of such state of education on their use of bank credit, and to proffer policy recommendations as a challenge for the twenty-first century. The connection between women’s education and national development is examined and the significance of bank credit is explored. The paper concludes with policy implications and challenges for the twenty-first century.
 
Item: African Journal of Political Science Vol.3 No. 2, 1998: 1-14
Title: The Appropriated State: Political Structure and Cycles of Conflict in Nigeria, 1900  1993
Description: Abstract Three times has post colonial Nigeria tried to operate a democratic constitution; three times have these attempts generated centrifugal conflict. Defective constitutions, inherently corrupt politicians and class struggle as explanations have limited causal logic. The recurrence of conflict only under particular conditions has tended to indicate the validity of the structural explanation, and the phased succession a cyclical interpretation. How valid is the discernment of cycles in Nigeria’s political history? If the claim that « historical events are unique  » is not demonstrated to follow from the nature of events, that « history repeats itself becomes an equally possible hypothesis. All history, therefore, is reasoned history. Yet, the phases of the Nigerian conflict cycle: Northern hegemony – Southern challenge (Crisis) – military rule, indicate a struggle to appropriate the state and reveal the existence of conflict units, the needs of which are usually sought and met in the same manner. Could these conflict cycles be said, therefore, to have immanent causes?
 
Item: African Journal of Political Science Vol.3 No. 2, 1998: 80-97
Title: Exiles In Their Own Home: Internal Population Displacement In Nigeria
Description: Abstract This essay examines the causes ami other factors which induce internal population displacement in Nigeria. It argues in opposition to traditional explanations that population displacement is a complex problem most often arising when the rights of a group are violated or denied; or when the physical security of members of the group is threatened. The nature of the state is a major causal factor inducing population displacement, especially where it is unable to ensure access for all its citizens or accord them adequate physical security.
 
Item: African Journal of Political Science Vol.5 No. 1, 2000: 146-162
Title: Patrimonialism and Military Regimes in Nigeria
Description: Abstract Military regimes in Nigeria exhibit patrimonial characteristics such as personal rule, absence of separation between the public and private realms, patron-client administrative networks, veneration of the ruler, massive corruption, ethnic/ sectional-based support, and repression of opposition and violation of human rights. Most of the dangers posed by military rule to democracy is not really because of its intrinsic authoritarian posture, although it is the most perceptible. It is the patrimonial tendency in military rule that creates the most transcendent and pernicious effect on democracy because of unconcealed ethnic/sectional alignment of regimes. This generates inter-ethnic acrimony and rivalry, in effect, delegitimizes the state and state power, and consequently, engenders a hostile environment to the growth of democracy.
 
Item: African Journal of Political Science Vol.5 No. 2, 2000: 5-29
Title: Economy and Politics in the Nigerian Transition
Description: Abstract This essay is an attempt to offer a general overview of the range of political and economic problems that served as the context for the transition to elected forms of governance in Nigeria after some sixteen years of military rule. These problems, even where they did not originate in military rule, were exacerbated by the years of political exclusion, chicanery, and repression as well as the continuing decline in the national economy and deep-seated corruption associated with prolonged military rule. It is suggested that a serious-minded effort at tackling these problems and the kinds of success recorded will be central to the viability of the Fourth Republic and the restoration of the confidence of the populace in public office holders. Several of the problems that need redressing are of a « nuts and bolts  » kind and the fact that they arose at all is indicative of the depth to which Nigeria sank during the military years; others are farmoreprofoundand challenge the very basis on which state-society relations as well as nation-territorial administration are presently constituted. Whether basic or profound, they will tax all the commitment and leadership qualities of the elected politicians of the Fourth Republic.
 
Item: African Journal of Political Science Vol.5 No. 2, 2000: 45-65
Title: Ethnicity and Transition to Democracy in Nigeria: Explaining the Passing of Authoritarian Rule in
Description: Abstract This essay addresses an important variable in Nigerian politics, namely, ethnicity and the ways in which it affects the conduct of national affairs. It represents an effort at theorizing the role andplace of ethnicity inthe transitionfrom authoritarianism in a multi-ethnic setting such as that represented by Nigeria. Drawing on historical evidence on the ways in which ethnicity was constructed in colonial and post-colonial Nigeria as well as the wide literature on the subject, an attempt is made to demonstrate the centrality of the variable to Nigerian politics but without suggestion that it is the sole or most important determinant of political outcomes. Indeed, it is argued that there are other important variables, such as class, which not only affect the political process but also impinge on ethnicity. The ways in which ethnicity influences the different phases of the transitionfrom authoritarianism are discussed drawing on the Nigerian experience.
 
Item: African Journal of Political Science Vol.5 No. 2, 2000: 67-86
Title: Last Card: Can Nigeria Survive Another Political Transition?
Description: Abstract This article critically examines the depth of the reforms and elections that underpinned Nigeria‘s recently concluded political transition. It also analyses the important challenges confronting democratic consolidation in the face of the « imperfect » nature of the political transition, revolutionary pressures from below and factional struggles within the hegemonic eliteall of which have direct implications for the social contract and the national question. At the end it is argued that this transition is Nigeria’s last chanceand except it transfers real power to the Nigerian people, the current struggles could signpost grave portends for the Nigerian Project.
 
Item: Africa Media Review Vol. 1 No. 1June,1986: 48-65
Title: Mobilizing People’s Support for Development: An Analysis of Public Enlightenment Campaigns in Africa
Description: Abstract This paper directs its attention on information campaign effectiveness. It examines some theoretical and practical considerations that should be taken into account in planning and executing public englightenment campaigns in Nigeria and other developing countries and offers a multimedia model for more effective information campaigns in these areas. According to the model, well prepared and packaged information campaign messages should flow from the information campaign headquartersto the mass media and the interpersonal and group communication channels, and through these channels to the target audiences with continual monitoring and evaluation by campaign officials. The suggested model is diagramatically provided. Re’sume’ Cet article se penche sur la question de l’efficacite des campagnes de sensibilisation. II examine certain aspects theoriques et pratiques qui devraient etre pris en consideration en matiere de planification ou d’execution des campagnes de sensibilisation au Nigeria ou dans d’autres pays en voie de developpement et suggere un modele multimedia pour plus d’efficacite campagnes d’information dans ces regions. Selon ce modele, des messages bien preparer et bien elabores doivent circuler des quartiers generaux de la direction de la campagne aux mass media, aux canaux interpersonnels et aux groupes specifiques et de la etre convoyes vers les publics vises etant entendu que les responsables de la campagne guideront et evalueront contunuellement celle-ci. Un diagramme du modele propose accompagne l’article

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